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June 13 2018

16:32

E- textiles control home appliances with the swipe of a finger

Electronic textiles could allow a person to control household appliances or computers from a distance simply by touching a wristband or other item of clothing—something that could be particularly helpful for those with limited mobility. Now researchers, reporting in ACS Nano, have developed a new type of e-textile that is self-powered, highly sensitive and washable.
13:00

Nanowires for sustainable, renewable energy

Recent studies have revealed that semiconductor nanowires offer unique advantages for a wide range of applications. An EU-funded project is breaking new ground in the move towards sustainable and efficient energy harvesting by exploiting the unusual properties of these tiny yet highly controlled structures.
11:46

Graphene carpets: So neurons communicate better

A study led by SISSA and published in Nature Nanotechnology reports for the first time the phenomenon of ion trapping by graphene carpets and its effect on the communication between neurons. The researchers have observed an increase in the activity of nerve cells grown on a single layer of graphene. Combining theoretical and experimental approaches, they have shown that the phenomenon is due to the ability of the material to 'trap' several ions present in the surrounding environment on its surface, modulating its composition. Graphene is the thinnest bi-dimensional material available today, characterised by incredible properties of conductivity, flexibility and transparency. Although there are great expectations for its applications in the biomedical field, only very few works have analysed its interactions with neuronal tissue.

June 11 2018

21:01

Nano-decorations in nature's subsurface water filter

When bacteria and viruses get into well water and make people sick, often the contamination comes after heavy rain or flooding. In 2000, more than 2,300 people in Walkerton, Ontario, got sick when, after unusually heavy rains. E. coli bacteria found their way to drinking water wells. Seven people died.
20:29

Designing a better superconductor with geometric frustration

Superconductors contain tiny tornadoes of supercurrent, called vortex filaments, that create resistance when they move. This affects the way superconductors carry a current.
20:28

Scientists have a blast with aluminum nanoparticles

Army scientists proved a decades-old prediction that mixing TNT and novel aluminum nanoparticles can significantly enhance energetic performance. This explosive discovery is expected to extend the reach of U.S. Army firepower in battle.
16:06

New bolometer is faster, simpler, and covers more wavelengths

Bolometers, devices that monitor electromagnetic radiation through heating of an absorbing material, are used by astronomers and homeowners alike. But most such devices have limited bandwidth and must be operated at ultralow temperatures. Now, researchers say they've found a ultrafast yet highly sensitive alternative that can work at room temperature—and may be much less expensive.
11:50

Tiny defects in semiconductors created 'speed bumps' for electrons—researchers cleared the path

UCLA scientists and engineers have developed a new process for assembling semiconductor devices. The advance could lead to much more energy-efficient transistors for electronics and computer chips, diodes for solar cells and light-emitting diodes, and other semiconductor-based devices.

June 08 2018

12:06

Light-interacting nanostructures produce a remarkable frequency doubling effect

By combining two very different light-interacting nanostructures, A*STAR researchers have demonstrated a surprisingly strong enhancement of a frequency doubling effect.
12:05

Direct nanoscale patterning of LED surfaces brings new possibilities for the control of light

Nanoscale patterns designed to bend, deflect and split light can now be fabricated directly on light-emitting diode (LED) surfaces using an innovative etching method developed by A*STAR researchers. The new fabrication scheme creates new possibilities for the facile control of light output.

June 07 2018

11:44

Double-layered porous nanotubes with spatially separated photoredox surfaces

Solar energy conversion of water into H2 through photocatalysis is considered a promising approach for H2 production. However, the separation efficiency of charge carriers is the key to improving the efficiency of photocatalytic hydrogen production. A recent study reveals that the double-layered porous nanotubes with spatially separated photoredox surfaces were synthesized by a self-template strategy and show enhanced photocatalytic activity toward hydrogen production.

June 06 2018

21:36

Targeting strategy may open door to better cancer drug delivery

Bioengineers may be able to use the unique mechanical properties of diseased cells, such as metastatic cancer cells, to help improve delivery of drug treatments to the targeted cells, according to a team of researchers at Penn State.
17:00

Single molecular insulator pushes boundaries of current state of the art

Ever shrinking transistors are the key to faster and more efficient computer processing. Since the 1970s, advancements in electronics have largely been driven by the steady pace with which these tiny components have grown simultaneously smaller and more powerful—right down to their current dimensions on the nanometer scale. But recent years have seen this progress plateau, as researchers grapple with whether transistors may have finally hit their size limit. High among the list of hurdles standing in the way of further miniaturization: problems caused by "leakage current."
09:25

Density gradient ultracentrifugation for colloidal nanostructures separation and investigation

Density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGUC), as an effective method for the purification of nanomaterials, has attracted research. A recent review was reported by Science Bulletin in a paper titled "Density gradient ultracentrifugation for colloidal nanostructures separation and investigation," by Xiaoming Sun and Liang Luo et al from Beijing University of Chemical Technology. The authors systematically introduce the classification, mechanism and applications of density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGUC) with various separation examples, demonstrating the versatility of such an efficient separation technique.

June 05 2018

14:39

Unzipping graphene nanotubes into nanoribbons

In a new study published in EPJ B, Basant Lal Sharma from the Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur provides a detailed analysis of how the flow of heat and electrons is affected at the interface between an 'armchair' shaped carbon nanotube and a zigzagging nanoribbon made up of a single-layer carbon honeycomb sheet of graphene.
13:44

Golden nanoglue completes the wonder material

In a recent study, scientists at the University of Oulu have developed a nanojunction, joining one of the most promising novel materials, molybdenum disulfide, with nickel.
12:40

Ocean carbon imaged on the atomic scale

Dissolved Ocean Carbon (DOC) in the ocean is one of the largest pools of reduced carbon on Earth. It's about 200 times larger than the living biosphere and comparable in size to the atmospheric CO2 reservoir.  Due to its complexity, less than 10 percent of dissolved organic carbon has been characterized.  It's important to understand what this carbon pool is, so we can predict how this pool of carbon will respond to increasing temperatures from climate change.
12:24

Harnessing silicon nanoparticles to fight infections

There is an urgent need for better methods to treat bacterial infection in the race between developing new antibiotics and the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria.
12:22

Making composite material smart with precious metal

Doping polymer brushes with gold nanoparticles results in a switchable composite material which changes its thickness depending on the pH value. The research by physicists at the TU Darmstadt, published in the journal Soft Matter, could be used to design chemical nanosensors in diagnostics or environmental analytics.

June 04 2018

12:43

Photoexcited graphene puzzle solved

Light detection and control lies at the heart of many modern device applications, such as smartphone cameras. Using graphene as a light-sensitive material for light detectors can offer significant improvements with respect to materials being used nowadays. For example, graphene can detect light of almost any color, and it gives an extremely fast electronic response within one millionth of a millionth of a second. Thus, in order to properly design graphene-based light detectors it is crucial to understand the processes that take place inside the graphene after it absorbs light.
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