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May 29 2017

19:57

Fractionating DNA—from hours to minutes

Researchers of the University of Twente in The Netherlands developed a glass microchip for ultrafast separation and purification of DNA fragments. The chip, moreover, is easy to produce and cheap. The UT scientists published their results in Microsystems and Nano Engineering, a Nature publication.
15:00

Squeezing every drop of fresh water from waste brine

Engineers at the University of California, Riverside have developed a new way to recover almost 100 percent of the water from highly concentrated salt solutions. The system will alleviate water shortages in arid regions and reduce concerns surrounding high salinity brine disposal, such as hydraulic fracturing waste.
12:01

New method improves stability of perovskite quantum dots

EPFL scientists have built a new type of inorganic nanocomposite that makes perovskite quantum dot exceptionally stable against air exposure, sunlight, heat, and water.
11:35

Copper hydroxide nanoparticles provide protection against toxic oxygen radicals in cigarette smoke

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have developed a technique that reduces the toxic effects of commercially available cigarettes. In spite of the fact that the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that some 6 million people die every year as a consequence of tobacco consumption, the number of smokers around the world is on the rise. The number of tobacco-related deaths is equivalent to the fatality rate that would occur if a passenger plane were to crash every hour. According to figures published by the German Federal Statistical Office, the tobacco industry generated a turnover of around EUR 20.5 billion in 2016 through the sale of cigarettes in Germany alone.
11:29

Nanomaterials with potential for environmentally friendly hydrogen production

In an article in the journal Energy and Environmental Science, researchers from Uppsala University, Sweden, present a type of low-cost and environmental-friendly organic polymer nano-material as photocatalysts for hydrogen generation, and propose the working mechanism of the photocatalytic reactive site.
10:44

Light emitting quantum dots could ease synthesis of novel compounds

At one time you could wander through the labs of pharmaceutical companies and hardly ever see light being used to mediate chemical reactions. Now "photoredox catalysis" has become an essential way to synthesize novel organic compounds.

May 26 2017

11:04

Nanopore technology makes leap from DNA sequencing to identifying proteins

In the May issue of PLOS Computational Biology, scientists from UC San Diego and the University of Notre Dame report on a study that could open up the field for nanopore-based protein identification – and eventually proteomic profiling of large numbers of proteins in complex mixtures of different types of molecules.

May 25 2017

19:57

Research could bring 'drastically' higher resolution to your TV and smartphone

Researchers at the University of Central Florida have developed a new color changing surface tunable through electrical voltage - a breakthrough that could lead to three times the resolution for televisions, smartphones and other devices.
13:08

Researchers find new way to control light with electric fields

Researchers from North Carolina State University have discovered a technique for controlling light with electric fields.
09:37

Nanocar is the first step toward a controlled transport system at the molecular scale

Dr. Saw-Wai Hla and Dr. Eric Masson are thrilled with their team's performance in the world's first nanocar race in April, but for them, it was a fun starting point to a much larger goal.

May 24 2017

14:31

Three-dimensional graphene: Experiment at BESSY II shows that optical properties are tuneable

An international research team has for the first time investigated the optical properties of three-dimensional nanoporous graphene at the IRIS infrared beamline of the BESSY II electron storage ring. The experiments show that the plasmonic excitations (oscillations of the charge density) in this new material can be precisely controlled by the pore size and by introducing atomic impurities. This could facilitate the manufacture of highly sensitive chemical sensors.
14:26

Paper test strip could help heart failure patients monitor their condition at home

Contrary to the condition's name, heart failure doesn't mean the heart has stopped pumping—it's just not working at full strength. It can often be managed with medications and lifestyle changes, but its progression needs to be monitored closely. Now scientists have developed a new test strip that could potentially allow patients to do this at home for the first time. Their study appears in the journal ACS Nano.
11:39

What is nanomedicine, and how can it improve childhood cancer treatment?

A recent US study of people treated for cancer as children from the 1970s to 1999 showed that although survival rates have improved over the years, the quality of life for survivors is low. It also showed this was worse for those who were treated in the 1990s.
09:57

A fresh look inside the protein nano-machines

Proteins digest food, and fight infections and cancer, and serve other metabolic functions. They are basically nano-machines, each one designed to perform a specific task. But how did they evolve to match those needs, and how did genes encode the structure and function of proteins? Researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, the Institute for Basic Science, Korea, and the Rockefeller University, U.S., have conducted a study that tackles this question and explains the basic geometry of the gene-to-protein code by connecting proteins to properties of amorphous physical matter.
09:56

Water is surprisingly ordered on the nanoscale

Nanometric-sized water drops are everywhere—in the air as droplets or aerosols, in industrially produced medications, and within rocks and oil fields. To understand the behavior of these drops, it is necessary to know how they interact with their hydrophobic environment. This interaction takes places at the curved droplet interface, a sub-nanometric region that surrounds the small pocket of water. Researchers from EPFL, in collaboration with the institute AMOLF in the Netherlands have discovered that molecules on the surface of the drops were much more ordered than expected. Their surprising results have been published in Nature Communications. They pave the way to a better understanding of atmospheric, biological and geological processes.

May 23 2017

11:03

Report sheds new insights on the spin dynamics of a material candidate for low-power devices

Computers process and transfer data through electrical currents passing through tiny circuits and wires. As these currents meet with resistance, they create heat that can undermine the efficiency and even the safety of these devices.
10:43

Research reveals insights into optical properties of plasmonic nanostructures

University of Arkansas researchers have helped define the optical properties of plasmonic nanostructures, work that could lead to improved sensors in security and biomedical devices, and have applications in solar cells. The research team in the Department of Physics recently published its findings in the journal PLOS ONE.
10:38

Graphene on silicon carbide can store energy

By introducing defects into the perfect surface of graphene on silicon carbide, researchers at Linköping University in Sweden have increased the capacity of the material to store electrical charge. This result, which has been published in the scientific journal Electrochimica Acta, increases our knowledge of how this ultrathin material can be used.

May 22 2017

15:00

Next-gen computing: Memristor chips that see patterns over pixels

Inspired by how mammals see, a new "memristor" computer circuit prototype at the University of Michigan has the potential to process complex data, such as images and video orders of magnitude, faster and with much less power than today's most advanced systems.
15:00

Speeding up quality control for biologics

Drugs manufactured by living cells, also called biologics, are one of the fastest-growing segments of the pharmaceutical industry. These drugs, often antibodies or other proteins, are being used to treat cancer, arthritis, and many other diseases.
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